Batteries for emergency lights

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A LiFePo4 Battery powers all of the lamps in emergency lights and illuminated emergency exit signs. These batteries may be recharged in order to keep the emergency light operational at all times. The emergency light has circuitry that both charges and maintains the battery.

EMERGENCY LIGHT BATTERIES: A GUIDE TO THE DIFFERENT KINDS

Lithium ion batteries

It is the oldest form of rechargeable battery technology of , Batteries for emergency lighting with sealed lead-acid batteries. Due to the lead alloy plates in the acid, these devices are referred to as "lead-acid." Acid dissolves the plates, releasing electrons with a charge that we know as electricity. It has lately become possible to make lead-acid batteries completely sealed so that they don't need to be filled with water to maintain their acid levels.

Take a look at our selection of emergency flashlight batteries.

Since they didn't require any acid, nickel-cadmium batteries were the first ever rechargeable "dry" batteries. Other technologies have since been created, however they tend to be more expensive than the first. This magnetic reaction produces the charged electrons needed to create electricity, and it occurs because the two metals in the nickel-cadmium battery are separated by a dielectric (non-conductive) layer.

WHICH ONE IS RIGHT FOR YOU?

These two types of rechargeable batteries have their own perks and downsides.

VOLTAGES IN THE BATTERY

The voltage of the batteries used in emergency lights ranges from 6 VDC to 24 VDC. Connecting brighter lamps to the emergency lights is possible since higher voltages provide more power to the emergency lights. When a remote lamp-head is attached to an emergency light unit, they perform better since there will be less voltage loss throughout the line distance. Finally, higher voltage batteries allow for larger wattage lights, which adds still another level of brightness.

It's critical to use the same voltage and kind of battery when swapping out the batteries in an emergency lighting fixture. In any case, the bulbs will be blown if the voltage is too high or too low. If the battery voltage is different from the voltage on the circuit card, then the battery will not be able to charge.

Having the wrong battery in place will prevent emergency lights from working properly in a circumstance where the building's AC power is down. Preventative maintenance is mandated by OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) requirements to ensure that the units will function in the case of a power outage.

  • BATTERIES FOR EMERGENCY LIGHTS: Power lamp heads for at least 90 minutes
  • Low price and easy replacement
  • Available in a range of voltages and amps.
  • OSHA mandates testing on a monthly and annual basis.

All emergency lights include buttons for checking the batteries. An emergency light unit's test button allows you to see how much battery power is left in the emergency light before switching from AC power.

A BATTERY FOR EMERGENCY LIGHTS MAY NEED TO BE REPLACED.

Owners of emergency lights are required by OSHA to undertake monthly and annual scheduled maintenance. If your emergency light batteries fail the 90-second or 90-minute readiness tests (i.e. they don't light up), you may need to replace them.

Fortunately, most new luminaries feature a push-to-test mechanism that provides you an accurate battery readout, making the maintenance process a breeze. To simulate a loss of AC electrical power, press this test button to turn on the device's cutoff circuits, which should cause the battery to trip. There are no lights when the battery is dead. Basically, it's that easy.

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